Terry Jones

Shaft Spine Alligned

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Hi

I went to see a Tour Van Specialist just the other week (im no pro by the way) i just wanted the correct shafts for me!! 

My clubs being mizuno mp 64 had a project x 5.5 shaft on them and were to stiff for me so went to see him and spent a good 6 hours on the range and in is workshop and came away with new shafts fitted galfroy blue graphite but still stiff shaft but a lot lighter than the old ones he done somthing that is called spine alligned which is new to me but he explained what it was all about and is something that places like American Golf and some pro shops if not all dont do .

basicaly when you buy clubs off the shelf all the decal all points the same way and looks nice however when the shaft as been spine allingned they dont to some peoiple it may seem that the shaft is twisted but its not .

so off ive been and played two rounds with these new shafts fitted in bad weather wind and rain but i just cant wait for it to dry out as my game as improved allready 

 

my question is how many people here have had custom fitted shafts and had them spine alligned and has it made any improvement to your game 

Edited by Terry Jones

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It's good if you believe that this one small thing will make a difference to your game. Of course if your not swinging the same each time or if your not making a great contact with the ball then spine aligning will be working only 5% of the time for you.

its one less thing to think about, or one less thing to blame, and that's Gotta be good. Whether I'd pay for it, or not, is a completely different matter. Getting things like swingweight fixed, or having all your shafts matched to one another, if probably a better for your game. If you go to a proper club fitter then these things are usually taken care of as standard but to be honest lots of us buy things off the shelf and it seems to work fine.

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If you have ever had a set of clubs where there was one or two irons that you just never got on with, then spine aligning (or rather lack of it) could well be the problem.

What it does is ensure that the shafts are all the same stiffness.  Imagine playing a set where some were stiff and some regular, are you going to hit them all the same??

In the two sets prior to having this done, one I hated the 3 iron but loved the 2 iron and 4 iron, the other set loved the 3, 4 and 6 and below but could not hit the 5 to save myself.

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Never heard it ever described as having anything to do with stiffness matching.  Certainly my understanding of it it nothing like that .... and since there is no standard for stiffness then I can't really see how that can be done by just spinning the shaft.

 

anyway, as before its just one thing to think about ... or one less thing to blame for your poor shots ;)

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I believe that we should, if we can afford it, have all our shafts/clubs spine aligned, simply to remove any differences/variables that can pray on your mind. In fact all good manufacturers will do this as standard when they makes sets/woods/etc...The only time, generally, it MIGHT go wrong if is a head comes off and your technician can't or doesn't check when she/he refits it.

This will provide peace of mind that whatever is going wrong isn't anything but the player, i.e. the clubs are fully fitted, the clubs are correct, fitted/correct ball, new glove, new/clean grips, correct tee height, comfy shoes..... so if all else is correct, a players performance can only be blamed on the .........................player.

I do tend to agree with Brian T though: one less thing to blame, and for us mere mortal high handicappers it makes no real difference.

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I talked of this many times in the old forum, and it's an interesting mix of fact and fiction.  If you ever get a look at a bare shaft, hold one side to a sturdy desk and ping the end.  You'll see it oscillate, vertically at first then in more of a circular motion.  When it reaches the point of it's natural frequency you'll see that it oscillates in a single plane, the spine (spline) is at 90deg to this plane.  This is where the material is either welded (steel) or thickest (composite).  Align the spine along the swing plane and the shaft is at it's stiffest, perpendicular and it's at it's most flexible.  These are the facts.

Does it make any difference?  Psychologically, maybe.  Physically, unlikely. Natural frequencies are very precise things, gluing shafts into heads isn't.  Do you align the spine towards the head of the swing plane or behind it?  If you align it perpendicular is it towards the player or away?  Can you be sure that the glue is evenly distributed around the inside of the hozel, is the spline precisely aligned with the desired swing plane (no...).  

The conclusion is that it does make a difference, just how much is questionable. The irony is that because my irons were custom built by a proper clubmaker mine are all aligned and frequency matched :)

 

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59 minutes ago, TheLyth said:

I always thought a steel shaft was 'pulled' so doesn't have the seam that graphite/carbon has.

I also thought this....

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You are both partly correct.  Steel shafts are pulled from steel tube (and then spun formed for non-parallel shafts).  However the tube is made initially by rolling a plate and welding, it's far too expensive to do it from solid, so there is always a seam*.  The trick is to ensure that by the time the 4" dia tube the shaft is made from the weld doesn't work harden so continuous heat treatment is required.  Composite shafts don't tend to have seams as they are wound around a mandrel (although cheaper ones usually have a core made from two or three lamination laid along the length), the variation comes from changes in fibre and adhesive thickness.

With composite shafts I've always wondered why they haven't started making dedicated left/right hand versions.  The method of  winding could massively change a shaft characteristics

* Not so for ductile materials like aluminium.  When toothpaste tubes were made from it you wouldn't believe how little material actually went into making one.

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Thank you.  I used to do this all the time on the early days of the site.  Rather enjoyed doing another little tech explaination  

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