Golfshake Editor

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  1. Good choice! Not the monstrosity that is the PGA Centenary. Excellent! There are a number of stunning courses in northern Perthshire. Pitlochry stands out in my mind. It's not always about the "quality" of a course, but the experience that it provides you. That's what I'm like with Bute GC. It feels uniquely special to me.
  2. Rothesay Golf Club...
  3. If you watched the Arnold Palmer Invitational on Sunday, you would have seen Rory McIlroy hitting some incredibly long tee shots, reducing Bay Hill to a drive and pitch course at times. Despite what the R&A and USGA have stated, this is something that is becoming more commonplace, with courses continually being stretched beyond their limits. It's making the game more one-dimensional, and harder for a talent like Rory to distinguish himself, as technology has made it easier for more players to hit the ball extraordinary distances. What do you think? I've put my thoughts into a larger article, but do you even see it as a problem, or has the game been outpaced by the clubs and balls available today?
  4. Looking at the spectacular and breathtaking Lofoten Links in Norway - situated 100 miles inside the Arctic Circle - it got me thinking of some of the most scenic courses that I've played, and how did they compare with that incredible place. Fair to say that I haven't seen anything else quite like it! I'll forever have a warm attachment to Bute Golf Club, which was the formative course in my life. In terms of a setting and the tranquility, it's a real personal one for me. So, what is the most spectacular or scenic (maybe even strangely located) course that you've played?
  5. This week is the first Arnold Palmer Invitational since the legendary host passed away last year. We all know the incredible impact that he had on the game's enduring popularity from the 1950s onwards, in addition to the great charitable work he did with child hospitals, which has raised questions about the non-participation of some of the biggest names in golf. World Number One, Dustin Johnson is absent. As are Jordan Spieth, Phil Mickelson and Adam Scott to pick out a few notables. It's a busy time of the season with two World Golf Championships in the space of three weeks, leading into the Masters next month. These guys are trying to build a schedule for Augusta, and perhaps understandably don't want to play such a consistent run of tournaments before the first major of the year. That said, considering the legacy of Arnold Palmer, should they have made an exception this year to support the event and pay tribute to Arnold Palmer? It's certainly hard to downplay the emotive argument in this case.
  6. Links or Resort? There are some incredible regions for seaside golf throughout the UK, which are widely celebrated, but there are also come wonderful inland resorts that can offer tremendous golf alongside a great hotel and spa experience. Which of these do you prefer? Golfshake's Josh Carr has picked out some examples to compare the two sides: http://www.golfshake.com/news/view/10889/Links_vs_Resort_Which_Come_Out_on_Top_in_the_UK.html Personally, the golf always trumps everything else, so I would always elect a links area, whether it be St. Andrews, East Lothian, Southport or the Scottish Highlands.
  7. It's just been announced that Royal St. George's will host the Open Championship in 2020. It will be the 15th time that the game's oldest major has come to Sandwich, with St. Andrews widely expected to be the venue of the 150th Open in 2021. R&A Chief Executive Martin Slumbers has confirmed that Turnberry remains on the rotation (despite its controversial owner) and that Muirfield will return providing the members vote to open up for female members. Question I have is, what is your favourite venue on the Open rotation? It can be for whatever reason. The quality of the course, location, or particular memories you have there. It goes without saying what mine is, considering I live in the Home of Golf, but I'm intrigued to see which of them stands out to everyone else?
  8. That's probably the main argument in its favour. Pebble Beach seems beyond us...so any chance to play it should be grasped. Nonetheless, it's hard to beat the trio of Dunhill courses. Must be a dream to play in. Rich man's toy, of course!
  9. In theory, you could argue that the Masters is the "easiest" of the bunch to win. Providing, that is, the player feels comfortable at Augusta National. Field is usually around 90-95, and you can automatically discount about ten former champions, and a handful of champions. Suddenly it becomes a competitive tournament of around 75. And how many of those guys feel they can win there? For Sergio, considering his record, I feel that the Open is the one he's most likely to win. He's more than capable, but than can only take you so far. Securing a major victory would be the validation of an excellent career that still has many years left.
  10. Harsh, but true! His current caddie Joey LaCava has the easiest job in the world right now.
  11. It's the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am this week on the PGA Tour. It's a fairly awful event to watch on television, with the second-rate celebrities dominating the coverage. Bill Murray could do with falling down a gopher hole. However, it's an incredibly stunning place and is their version of the Alfred Dunhill Links Championship. Question is...as an amateur, which event would you rather play in? Opportunity to experience Pebble Beach, Spyglass Hill and Monterey Peninsula in the California sunshine, or St. Andrews, Carnoustie and Kingsbarns in the unpredictable October in Scotland? For me, as a resident in the Home of Golf, it's a no brainer. Dunhill any day of the week!
  12. We all have theories and questions about Tiger's fitness and game after his withdrawal from the Dubai Desert Classic. Nine-time major winner, Gary Player's view is that Woods is suffering from the yips, using his chipping woes from a couple of years ago as evidence. Now, I'm very much of the opinion that his problems are as much mental as they are physical. In fact, that may very well be the crux of the issue. He looks like a lost man on the golf course. And it's sad to see. Whether Player is right or not is another thing entirely. But there are clearly confidence and belief issues within the psychology of Tiger Woods. What do you think?
  13. How great was Sergio in Dubai? Leading from start to finish. He's now 37, and showing that there is still millage in his career. But the big question is, can he FINALLY win a major? Every year, I keep saying it, and he continually lets me down. But I believe that this could just be his time. Last month, I predicted that Garcia would win the Open at Birkdale. That was long before the Desert Classic. So, I've stuck my neck out. Don't let me down, Sergio!
  14. Looking for a golf break to a stunning destination? We're running our #WinterBirdieBlitz competition at the moment, which ends in a few days. It's all about rewarding golfers playing at this time of year. Prize is an incredible holiday to Mauritius. It's easy to get involved. CLICK HERE to Enter.
  15. It's hard to argue against that one! Different question, then. Who would you LEAST like to caddie for?